Births Deaths Marriages, Maternal Kin, Photographs, Virginia

A candle was lit in his honor.

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Births Deaths Marriages, Paternal Kin, Photographs

Gold.

Tonight my family celebrated the 50th wedding anniversaries of two of my cousins (who are brothers) and their wives. Another of their brothers and his wife, who came in from Maryland, hit 51 this year. My parents made 60 years in May. So did my uncle and aunt. I can tick off an easy dozen couples in the 25-49 year range and a couple dozen more that only death parted after decades. That this kind of abiding love is commonplace among my people is a blessing beyond measure. We hear so much about the dismal state of the Black family, but here’s the Black family I know. Here’s the Black family I love.

Cheers to you, Effenus and Helen, and Fred and Linda, and Dock and Barbara! Many more!

One of the blessed couples.

“Renewal of vows,” eldest grandson presiding.

The youngest in his first hard-bottoms. (Stacy Adams!) He said he felt like a gentleman.

50

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Births Deaths Marriages, Enslaved People, Maternal Kin, Oral History, Politics, Rights, Virginia

A great day in Charlotte Court House.

The freshly unveiled marker.

“First, I’d like to recognize my family, Joseph R. Holmes’ family, here today — including three of his brother Jasper’s great-granddaughters. Some here may remember their uncle, Dr. J. Maxwell Allen, who practiced dentistry in Charlotte Court House. His sister, my great-aunt Julia, first told me of Joseph Holmes when I was an inquisitive teenager digging for my roots. She did not know the details — only that her grandfather’s brother Joseph, born enslaved, had been killed because of his political activity. That was enough, though, to set this journey in motion. 

My remarks: 

“On behalf of the Holmes-Allen family, I extend thanks to all who made this day possible. So many in Charlotte County gave in so many ways — time, money, influence, prayer (look at God!) — and we are profoundly grateful for your embrace and support of this project. “We are also grateful to Kathy Liston. When I reached out to Kathy nearly ten years ago, seeking help to find the truth of Joseph Holmes’ life, I did not even dream of this day. I first visited Charlotte Court House in 2012 at Kathy’s invitation. She took me to Joseph Holmes’ homestead; to Roxabel, the plantation on which he may have been enslaved; to the school at Keysville whose establishment he championed; and finally to this courthouse, to the very steps on which he bled and died. The historical marker we reveal today stands as a testament to Kathy’s persistence and insistence, her values and vision, her energy and expertise, and we cannot thank her enough. 

“The beautiful story of Joseph R. Holmes’ life, and the terrible story of his death, were all but forgotten in Charlotte County — suppressed by some, repressed by others. This is an all too common phenomenon of American history. Though Africans arrived in this very state in 1619, the contributions of African Americans to the building of this country — both literally and metaphorically — are seldom recalled, much less memorialized. Black communities dealt with their trauma by hiding it away, refusing to speak of their loss and pain. It is never too late, however, to reclaim our heroes. 

“For hundreds of years, the Akan people of Ghana have used symbols, called adinkra, as visual representations of concepts and proverbs. The word Sankofa, often depicted as a bird looking toward its tail, means ‘go back and get it.’ The broader concept of Sankofa urges us to know our pasts as we move forward.Today, we have gone back for Joseph R. Holmes. In the shadow of Confederate monuments, we shine a light on his works; we affirm his life; we reclaim his legacy. As long as we speak his name, he lives forever. Will you say it with me? 

“Joseph R. Holmes. Joseph R. Holmes. Joseph R. Holmes. 

“Your family remembers. Your community remembers. We honor your life and sacrifice. 

“Thank you.”

(c) Ray Richardson

For press coverage, please see articles in the Washington PostRichmond Times-Dispatch, and Cardinal News.

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Births Deaths Marriages, Maternal Kin, Photographs, Virginia

Rest in peace, Jasper Maxwell Allen, Jr. (1931-2021).

Jasper M. Allen Jr.

My extended Allen family, which has always been small, recently lost its oldest member, my mother’s first cousin, Jasper Maxwell Allen, Jr. I never met Cousin Mack Jr., but for the last dozen years or so spoke with him once or twice a year by telephone. He was close to his beloved late wife Arnetta’s family, and I am grateful to them for this obituary:

The late Jasper Maxwell Allen, Jr. was born in Charlotte Courthouse, Virginia on February 10th, 1931, to the late Lena P. Allen, a school teacher and Dr. Jasper Maxwell Allen, Sr., a dentist. Jasper, Max, or Allen as most of us called him was a bit rambunctious as a child (by his own admittance), and often joked about his experiences as a kid and getting into mischief every now and then. One of his favorite stories to tell was how his beloved mother Lena was not only his mom, but also his teacher in elementary school. He would snicker about getting into what he called “double trouble” when he would misbehave in school!!

As a young man, Allen went on to Maryland State College, now known as the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree. He then went on to be drafted into the military and served during the Korean War, in both France and Germany. The military allowed him to utilize his degree and knowledge of technology and computers. During this time, he also acquired a love for the Volkswagen! While in the military, Allen would also go on to meet Merchant Marine Chief Henry Burton, who would later coincidentally, become his uncle in-law. After completing both college and his military tour Allen lived and worked in Washington DC before settling in Harlem, New York. His expertise in the world of technology earned him jobs with IBM, Rudband, and even a covert position that until this day he had never “spilled the beans” on. Which was absolutely within his nature. Allen was a “by the book” kind of guy.

While living in New York and working at Rudband he met who would later become the love of his life, Arnetta Lewis. Arnetta was Allen’s supervisor in the Key Punch Department. Their love blossomed during their carpool rides from work, in which Allen was the driver. At 90 years old, Allen could still describe the exact outfit and hair style Arnetta was wearing the day that they met (a gold and blue checkered jacket, a gold blouse and her hair was in a French roll). To quote him on their early encounters “my heart jumped up and moved around a bit!” Allen and Arnetta dated and later married on September 7th, 1957 and were married for 55 years. They would go on to leave Harlem and move to the Bronx where Allen spent the last 45 years. Allen and Arnetta did everything together! They bickered and fussed, partied, traveled, prayed, and loved their family and each as a unit. Arnetta preceded Allen in death in November of 2012.

As the elder of our family Allen remained the wise, smart, cool, funny, gracious, and slick guy we all loved, and we all had our very own special relationship with him. From the oldest to the youngest, he could hold a conversation with any of us about anything. He also knew how to get us to stop fussing at him by playing possum and faking a nap, he would sometimes peak one eye open to see if we were still there (Classic Allen).

Affectionately known as “Uncle Allen” by his New York family, Allen remained surrounded by loved ones no more than an elevator or a train ride away! Allen leaves behind nephews and nieces, Rodney A. Lewis, Juanita Lewis, Darcel Kennedy, John Harries, Rodney E. Lewis, Jasmine N. Lewis-Peguero, Kayla E.N. Lewis, Jasmine Rucker, Jamek Rucker, Kaiah Irene Lewis, Rodney Trey Lewis, Jason R. Peguero, Raul Peguero and Tracee Bryant. Allen also leaves behind a host of family and friends in his home state of Virginia. We love you and will miss you dearly Uncle Allen.

Cousin Mack, his mother Lena Jeffress Allen, and wife Arnetta Lewis Allen.
J. Maxwell Allen Jr. and his first cousins (my uncles) Charles C. Allen and John C. Allen III, circa 1938.
J. Maxwell Allen, his cousin/my aunt Marion Allen Christian, and his brother Cameron L. Allen.

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Births Deaths Marriages, North Carolina, Paternal Kin, Photographs

Remembering Reginald Henderson on his birthday.

In June of this year, the Henderson family lost an extra-special cousin to COVID-19. Today would have been Reginald J. Henderson Sr.‘s 76th birthday. By happenstance, I ran across his high school yearbook online today and found his senior portrait.

We miss you, Cousin Reggie!

The Tiger (1962), G.W. Carver High School, Mount Olive, N.C., digitized at DigitalNC.

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Births Deaths Marriages, Maternal Kin, Military

Pvt. Danzie J. Wynn.

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Danzie J. Wynn (1895-1918), Army, World War I.

Danzie J. Wynn, son of Edward and Susan Henderson Wynn, registered for the World War I draft in Wayne County in 1917. Per his registration card, he was born 12 May 1896 in Dudley; lived in Dudley; was single; and was a tenant farmer working for Edward Wynn. He self-reported his race as Indian, but the registrar wrote on the back of his registration card: “Question #10 answered incorrectly party has always passed for a negro.”

Wynn was inducted and sent to Fort Greene, near Charlotte, North Carolina, for training. At the end of September 1918, he and the rest of Company B, 344 Labor Battalion, shipped out for Europe aboard the Teucer.

Three months later, Danzie Wynn was dead of influenza. He is buried at Brookwood American Cemetery in Surrey, United Kingdom.

Many thanks to cousin George Waters and to Marty Tschetter of Goldsboro-Wayne County Public Library for sharing this wonderful photograph; copies of cousin Danzie’s military records are found at Ancestry.com.

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Births Deaths Marriages, North Carolina, Other Documents, Paternal Kin, Photographs

They know of their own certain knowledge.

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In June 1923, my grandfather Roderick Taylor vouched for his first cousin Howard Willis Barnes when Barnes applied for a license to marry Elmer Pentecost Wright in Greensboro, North Carolina. Taylor was still spelling his first name with two D’s and no E at the time. His mother, Rachel Barnes Taylor, and Howard’s father, Ned Barnes, were siblings.

Handwritten on the rear: “To Jas. Battle from Roddrick Taylor.” The photo likely dates from about 1905.

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Births Deaths Marriages, Free People of Color

R.I.P. Ira Berlin.

Ira Berlin died this week. His Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South (1974) helped me make sense of the lives of my Henderson, Aldridge, Artis, Hagans and Seaberry ancestors, whose free status I had never suspected — or perhaps even heard of — when I began genealogical research. When I veered toward a Ph.D. in American History after law school, Professor Berlin tried to convince me to come to the University of Maryland. I chose Columbia University instead, though it pained me to miss an opportunity to study under him.

He is eulogized here and here.

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Births Deaths Marriages, Military, North Carolina, Paternal Kin, Photographs

Cousin Elmer turns 95.

Milford Elmer Carter Jr. recently celebrated his 95th birthday. Born in Wilson in 1923 to Wayne County natives Milford E. and Beulah Aldridge Carter, he and his family boarded briefly in Cora Miller Washington‘s home at 701 East Green Street, around the corner from the Elba Street home of Milford Carter Sr’s uncle, Jesse A. Jacobs Jr. and, per the 1922 city directory, lived at 905 East Vance Street. The family soon migrated to Pennsylvania, then New York City. M. Elmer Carter Jr. is a veteran of World War II.

Photos courtesy of Carla Carter Jacobs.

 

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